Ousted Sudanese dictator Omar al-Bashir sits in a Khartoum courtroom last September while standing trial for the illegal possession of foreign currency. (Mahmoud Haggag Mahmoud Ali/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Handing over Bashir: What it Might Mean for Sudan – and its Leaders (AUDIO INTERVIEW)

The Media Line speaks with Sudan-hand Annette Weber about Khartoum’s decision to let the International Criminal Court try the ousted dictator

Sudan says it is willing to allow the Hague-based International Criminal Court to try former president Omar al-Bashir for alleged genocide and other war crimes in connection with the Darfur rebellion of a decade ago.

The autocratic Bashir, in power for three decades, was toppled by the military last April during a wave of popular protests against the country’s exorbitant cost of living, as well as perceptions of rampant corruption by the president and his cronies.

The Media Line spoke with Dr. Annette Weber, a senior fellow and Sudan expert at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, to learn more about the decision, what it might mean for a country in transition, and – just as important – what might be the implications for some of those leading the transition.

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