This Hanukkah Give the Gift of Truth

The Media Line led twenty years ago in pioneering the American independent news agency in the Middle East, arguably the first in the region. We have always stayed true to our mission: to provide you with contextual sourced and trustworthy news. In an age of fake news masquerading as journalism, The Media Line plays a crucial role in providing fact-based news that deserves your support.

We're proud of the dozens of young students we've trained in our Press and Policy Student Program who will form the vanguard of the next generation of journalists to the benefit of countless millions of news readers.

Non-profit news needs public support. Please support us with your generous contributions:
Donate
We thank our loyal readers and wish you all the happiest of holidays
The Media Line

Saudi Arabia’s Salwa Canal

Al-Rai, Jordan, June 20

The construction of a maritime channel to separate Qatar from Saudi Arabia is being examined by authorities in Riyadh, which has already established a bidding deadline for the project. Over five international companies have thus far submitted proposals for the tender, vying for the right to complete the 12-month-long project. The channel, known as the Salwa Canal, is designed to be 60 kilometers in length, 200 meters in width, and 20 meters in depth. If established, it would turn Qatar into a de facto island, surrounded by nothing but water and a 1-kilometer-long stretch of Saudi territory that will host a military base and a nuclear waste site. The proposed project comes in the wake of turbulent times in the Arab Gulf, following the GCC-imposed boycott on Qatar in 2017. Now, over a year later, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are looking for new ways to further sever ties with Doha, by establishing a physical barrier between Qatar and the rest of the Arab world. The Salwa project, which is expected to cost over $750 million, will be financed by private investors in Saudi Arabia and the UAE, with the help of Egyptian drilling companies. With air and land routes leading to Qatar already closed off, this newest project poses a dangerous threat to the Qatari economy. For Qatar, losing all access to the mainland will increase pressure on the government to accept the GCC’s demands and abide by Riyadh’s dictates. Yet this project might also escalate the already high tensions along the border between the two countries, where violent clashes have erupted in the past. In an age when people are speaking of building bridges, Riyadh and Doha seem to be focused on digging tunnels of separation. Who knows what this will bring. – Muhammad Fahed

Did you know we’re celebrating our 20th Anniversary as the 1st American News Agency exclusively covering the Middle East?

  • The Middle East landscape is changing rapidly.
  • The roads in the region open to new possibilities.
  • The Media Line continues to pave the way to a far greater understanding of the region’s land, people, policies and governments through our trusted, fact-based news.

We’re an independent, ad-free, non-profit news agency and rely on friends like you!

Please make your gift today.
Thank you!

We paved the way to be the Trusted Mid East News you can rely on!

We’re an independent, ad-free, non-profit news agency and rely on friends like you!

Invest in the
Trusted Mideast
News source.
We are on the
front lines.

Personalize Your News
Upgrade your experience by choosing the categories that matter most to you.
Click on the icon to add the category to your Personalize news
Browse Categories and Topics
Wake up to the Trusted Mideast News source Mideast Daily News Email
By subscribing, you agree to The Media Line terms of use and privacy policy.
Wake up to the Trusted Mideast News source Mideast Daily News Email
By subscribing, you agree to The Media Line terms of use and privacy policy.