Several thousand supporters of Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu attend a rally in his support on the evening of November 26 in Tel Aviv. (Jack Guez/AFP via Getty Images)

The Conflicting Signs of Support for Binyamin Netanyahu (AUDIO INTERVIEW)

The Media Line seeks to make sense of a poor turnout at an anti-indictment rally, and an opinion poll that seems to show the prime minister’s party will do far better with him than without him

Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu is fighting for his political life, but also for his personal freedom. The two are connected.

Israel’s attorney-general has announced that he will indict Netanyahu on charges of bribery, fraud and breach of public trust in three separate criminal cases. The prime minister might go to jail.

Insisting that police investigators made up the evidence against him and are seeking, at the behest of the country’s Left, to remove him from office without an election, he is now using the word “coup.” It’s designed to incite his base.

To test the waters, Netanyahu had his party stage a Tuesday night rally in his support, the war cry being “Investigate the investigators.” The turnout of several thousand was far from what he had hoped for.

Does this mean he’s finished? Not necessarily: A new opinion poll shows that his party will do much better with him than without him in the next election.

To learn how these apparently conflicting signs can be reconciled, The Media Line spoke with Amotz Asa-El, an independent Israeli analyst and commentator on current affairs.

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