Sadiq al-Mahdi, a former prime minister of Sudan and just one of the country’s numerous opposition figures, attends Friday prayers on June 14 at a mosque linked to his National Umma Party in Khartoum's twin city of Omdurman. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)

Sudan’s Generals Have Disparate Interests, but So Do Its Civilians – All of Which Makes Achieving Democracy an Uphill Battle (AUDIO INTERVIEW)

Last week, the African Union mediated an agreement between Sudan’s citizens and opposition parties, on the one hand, and the Transitional Military Council (TMC), the generals who took control after the ousting of president Omar al-Bashir, on the other.

The generals on the TMC have their own, often diverging, interests, something that could stand in the way of moving toward democracy after a three-year transitionary period. But so do Sudan’s civilians. They might have spoken in a unified voice to obtain a say during this period, but their views, too, are far from monolithic, as The Media Line discovered in conversation with Dr. Annette Weber, a senior fellow and Sudan expert at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs.

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